OUR CONCEPT



Our super school will be called:  


Yampah Mountain High School - GlenX Super School



A bold and compelling idea will be at the center of our school:


We are building a school based on individual passions and community connections, with the goal of every student having a viable career option in a field they're passionate about by the time they graduate.  To do so we are breaking down the walls of the school house!  We will be learning in and outside the school and we will bring our community into our school to learn with us. Yampah Mountain High School in collaboration with GlenX will create the Yampah Mtn High School - GlenX Super School, blending our shared mission to support passions into education and career pathways. 
Yampah provides students with personalized learning plan to meet their educational goals, grow academically and earn a diploma. Student motivation and engagement is supported in a small school environment with attention to the whole student. Students, supported by Advisors, design learning plans that include: classes, independent study, college courses, credit recovery, internships, service learning, work, experiential & outdoor education. As well, students all create post-secondary education and career plans before graduation.

















To ensure that our school truly serves the needs of our community, we plan to get input from young people by:


We have surveyed and interviewed as many students at Yampah Mountain High School as possible, and given this as a joint project for the whole school  with many community supporters to work on developing.  


Student responses to each question (based on informal survey 1/2016):
1. How Students experience school, learning and career opportunities?
STUDENT RESPONSE (21 students)
-Pressure to succeed and get into college overwhelming, takes fun out of school. (11 students)
-Learning more fun with students/teachers we trust in an environment free from judging and failure (9 students)
-Learning is always better if it’s outside, hands-on, active, not sitting in seats listening to lecture 
(9 students)
-Being able to test out a lot of dreams is helpful to discovering the main dream (5 students)
-Changing your mind on what you want to do and be should be ok (5 students)


2. What core values unify school? 

STUDENT RESPONSE (24 students)
-Acceptance – all students despite background, issues or personality are welcomed. (21 students)
-Uniqueness – Yampah goes outside box to provide different learning opportunities through classes, trips, experiences, college and career opportunities (15 students)
-Community/Family – students and teachers are a part of a family, everybody chips in, everybody has eachother’s back (13 students)


3. How to support student-centered, standards-based learning at school?
STUDENT RESPONSE (16 students)
-More tutoring and one-on-one for students who struggle in core classes, especially math (14 students)
-More hands-on learning, experiments, using curriculum in real world settings (10 students)
-Students need to have better attendance so teachers don’t have to repeat lessons (9 students)
-More opportunities to take advanced college prep classes (8 students)


4. Student Agency and Engagement?
STUDENT RESPONSE (16 students)
-Learn to be yourself (14 students)
-Advisors/Teachers exposing students to different ideas, opportunities, skills (12 students)
-Service Learning projects help build community, give back, help students see beyond themselves and their problems (11 students)
-School has to feel like a safe place before students can learn (9 students)


5. Networks and Partnerships?
STUDENT RESPONSE (19 students)
-Local Colleges and Businesses (19 students)
-Transportation Resources (8 students)
-More opportunities to take advanced college prep classes (8 students)



















To get insights into how we can prepare our students for postsecondary education and the future of work, we plan to:


Work jointly with students and staff at Yampah Mountain High School, Mt BOCES, Colorado Mountain College, non-profits, businesses, city officials, and the community to implement the Yampah Mt High School-GlenX Super School. We have held community forums, interviews and surveyed many community member from business, nonprofits, other school and government organizations. 


Constituency responses to each question (based on informal survey 1/2016):
1. How Students experience school, learning and career opportunities?
COMMUNITY RESPONSE (Top 3 common themes)
-Every student learns differently – Need customizable education, holistic approach w/ relationship-based support.  First, a safe environment:  Children know they are loved, respected, accepted.  Second, personalized learning: Students provided curriculum, skill development and opportunities to discover and pursue a passion. 
-Every student given a clear career path - Many students pursue the vague opportunity of college.  Through self-discovery, wide exposure to job market and college opportunities, students will feel more confident in their post-graduate choice.
-Mistakes embraced – Failure is good.  All students encouraged to explore what makes them happy and discover what careers might best match their gifts.  Exploration, trying different things, developing life skills that translate into all careers is valued and developed.


2. What core values unify school?
YAMPAH EDUCATOR RESPONSES (TOP THEMES)
-Develop meaningful relationships and desire for lifelong learning
-Glasser’s Choice Theory to engage students internal motivations.  Principles from Coalition of Essential Schools to create an empowered school culture. Restorative Justice to solve problems.
-TPP – family literacy model that educates whole family
-Personalized Learning 


COMMUNITY RESPONSE (Top 3 common themes)
-Sense of community, student-centered education, teacher as coach
-Preparing kids with real world skills – respect, responsibility, perseverance, character
-Outside the box thinking, leadership development, lifelong learning


3. How to support student-centered, standards-based learning at school?
-Inquiry based curriculum – uncovering content through focused learning expeditions
-Personalized learning plans –advisor helps customize each student’s education and provide accountability and support to meet graduation and credit requirements.
-Community-based learning opportunities, service learning, credit recovery, work-based credits, college classes, career opportunities
-Curriculum aligned with CDE academic standards and 21st century skills
-Post secondary and workforce readiness collected and demonstrated through portfolio, senior paper, capstone project (all points summary from NOTES document)


4. Student Agency and Engagement?
COMMUNITY RESPONSE (Multiple Themes Common)
-Self-Discovery
-Ownership
-Freedom to explore and become
-Individuality
-Think Critically
-Safe, Caring, Family Environment
-Encourage to explore, think big, dream, discover
-Academic and life skills
-Learning in new and different ways


5. Networks and Partnerships?
COMMUNITY RESPONSE (Multiple suggestions)
-Health and Human Services
-Colorado Mountain College
-Local Chambers and Business Owners (Cradle to Career Initiative, Business Round Table)
-Local School Districts and State Agencies (CDE)
-Denver University MBA program and MSW program
-Regional Art, Culture and Educational Resources 
-Local tradespeople and craftspeople
-Local Athletic Organizations 

















Our school will also build on the inspiring examples, research, and ideas of others:


We would encourage everyone in our community to understand the philosophy of William Glasser's Choice Theory and in following the Quality School concepts, as well as becoming familiar with the 10 Principles of Ted Sizer's Coalition of Essential Schools

These will serve as the foundation for our school. To better understand the challenges to be address and inspiring responses to these challenges we recommend the following additional resources:
*Let it Ripple
*Sir Ken Robinson, who is an international adviser on education and has great points on the importance of creativity and rethinking education 
*Dave Eggars and 826 Valencia:
*Carol Dweck's Growth Mindset
*Thoughts and opinions of others around the country: http://xqsuperschool.org/voices


All the elements of our school will come together in powerful learning experiences for students:


At Yampah the curriculum is inquiry based, students are guided in uncovering content through focused learning expeditions. We ask students to explore Inquiry Questions so that learning becomes their own discovery. Students are supported in achievement & growth in their ability to master the Colorado Academic Standards & 21st Century Skills through a variety of guided learning opportunities. Personalized learning plans support each student to find relevance in education.
Student’s personalized plans allow them to earn credit through a variety of methods including: direct instruction in YMHS classes which include focused “passages” of the content area, individual studies or “personal passages”, online & internet-based learning, post-secondary options, and experiential learning experiences:
1. Students may participate in community-based learning opportunities. We regularly have students involved in service learning at local nonprofits, work-study internships at local businesses, and studies with artists in residence or other trades.
2. In collaboration with the CO Workforce Center, our online credit program, Key Train, aligned to the ACT Work Keys assessment, is designed to help students reach competency in workplace related academic skills including: mathematics, technology, research & observation, business writing, and teamwork.  Other online curriculum to support student learning at an individualized pace includes Kahn Academy and Study Island.
3. Credit can be earned through coursework at a post-secondary institution such as the local community college.  We encourage all students to earn dual high school and college credit at Colorado Mountain College in at least 1 class before graduation. We will pay any student to take up to 6 credits of college course work per semester. 
4. The YMHS Curriculum in each content area is based on the CDE Academic Standards & 21st Century Skills.  
















Our school will serve Specific Student population:


Youth ages 14-20, at-risk of not completing high school; specifically a student population that is 95%+  at-risk for dropping out according to the CDE criteria. Second is children, newborn to 3 ½ years old, whose teenaged parents are enrolled.



We are Redesigning an existing school:


Yampah Mountain High School


which will be organized as:


Yampah Mountain High School - GlenX Super School



When our school is fully enrolled, we expect to serve approximately:


200 students in the rural region of the Roaring Fork Valley. Students come from four school districts covering a 90 mile region.


Our current team:


Altai Chuluun
Leigh McGown
Mike Lowe
Susy Ellison
Lisa Moretti Doherty
Laura Smith

Katie Preston


The additional expertise and/or people we need are:


For the Yampah Mountain High School- GlenX Super School Project, our two organizations will work in direct collaboration and receive direct or support services from Colorado Mountain College and our business community through the Cradle Career Initiative Business Roundtable and the Roaring Fork Young Professionals.
As Yampah Mountain High School is the only public alternative educational setting serving all of Garfield county and parts of  Eagle and Pitkin County.  Our staff  also work regularly with a variety of community organizations to create positive outcomes for the children and parents enrolled in our program, i.e.: Qualistar, GarCo Childcare Division & DHS, La Leche League, Mountain Family Health, Growing Food Forward, Colorado Shines, Early Learning Ventures, Alpine Legal Services, CMC, Family Resource Center, CET, Catholic Charities, Advocate Safehouse, Mind Springs, Aspen Hope Center, Wiley Arts Center, CO Workforce Center, Cooking Matters, PREP and Colorado Workforce Center, Family Visitor Program/Nurse-Family Partnership amongst others. ‘

DISCOVER


​1. Students in the 21st Century

​What are your top three insights about the challenges facing your prospective students in the 21st century, both globally and in your community?


Across the country and similarly across our region, students, especially in high school, report that they are disengaged from school, and losing a sense of hope and well-being for the future.  Yampah Mountain High School worked with the Cradle to Career Initiative, along with our surrounding school districts to better understand these trends. The attached report shows that in many cases less than half the high school students in our region feel engaged at school. The Yampah Mt High School-GlenX Super School project aims to address this issue and give students a school that is relevant, engaging and provides them hope for the future.

Glasser, Maslow and many others clearly define the importance of safety and security for any of us to reach our greatest happiness and potential. We maintain a consistent commitment to personalizing each student’s plan, and upholding a sense of love and belonging, freedom, power and fun within our daily existence. Students, parents, faculty and our communities love our school; for many students, Yampah is home. 

Our holistic approach to serving our kids encourages trust and deepens relationships. Our advisory program allows kids to receive the affective support they need to be successful in school. Our kids know they belong. They know they are loved and they know they are deeply respected and accepted. Regardless of programming, schools fail kids when they do not place relationships and trust at the center of school culture.  For us, this priority then translates into student commitment to school, learning, confidence and respect for community.

CHALLENGES (Based on research of student and community survey responses 1/2016):
1. Students are faced with many external and internal stressors from a variety of environmental factors , i.e. socio-economic struggles, traumatic life experiences and education systems out of touch with students' current experiences, often resulting in a lack of hope, engagement and well-being.
2. Living on a planet that is in constant change, requiring a need for critical decision-making to become the change-makers instead of having changes made for you.
3. Learning to be 'systems thinkers' able to evaluate multitudinous data streams and make decisions based on that data.

STUDENT SURVEY RESPONSES (informal, online survey 1/2016):
1. Challenges facing students in 21st century
-Bridging the skill and wisdom gap – science and technology accelerating, common sense is
regressing. Brains focused on immediate issues, need more reflection to create
understanding
-Living on planet in constant change. Need critical decision-making skills to control destiny
rather than have world control student. (from NOTES document)
-Access to opportunity. Rural students, especially those in poverty, struggle to put in play a
game plan to move their lives forward due to transportation, work opportunities, financial
resources, network and careers with growth tracks
STUDENT RESPONSE (24 students)
-Discernment – navigating confusing overwhelming media to figure out how to live, what to
do, be true to self (7 student responses)
-Sustainable living – smarter ways to be in the world where people don’t take, but give and
provide for future generations (7 student responses)
-Terrorism & War – despite efforts at peace, world is more at war than ever (6 student
responses)
-Curing Disease – finding real solution that can scale for free to everyone in need (5 student
responses)
-Creating community – finding purpose and happiness in helping others in a selfish world
with so much focus on the superficial, body image, pop culture, etc. (5 student responses)

CONSTITUENT SURVEY RESPONSES (informal, online survey 1/2016):
Top 3 common themes:
-Bridging the skill and wisdom gap – science and technology accelerating, common sense is regressing.  Brains focused on immediate issues, need more reflection to create understanding
-Living on planet in constant change.  Need critical decision-making skills to control destiny rather than have world control student.
-Access to opportunity.  Rural students, especially those in poverty, struggle to put in play a game plan to move their lives forward due to transportation, work opportunities, financial resources, network and careers with growth tracks


GSP Results Gallup Presentation.pptx.pdf

2013 Member District HKCS Review.pptx.pdf
















2. Youth Experience & Aspirations

What are your top three insights from young people about how they experience school and learning in their lives, about how they see their education and career opportunities, and about your role in preparing them for the future?


Twenty-First century students know that the world is small, and friends exist on screen as well as across the globe. They know that the future is indefinable, and that learning process and skills are only important if it makes one nimble and inspired. They know that information can be found on the phone in their pocket, and their ability to manage incredibly complicated lives would leave most adults spinning. Yampah focuses on helping students gain the skills they will need to interact in this 'new' world.
STUDENT SURVEY TOP 3 THEMES:
1. Learning is more fun for students with teachers we trust in an environment free from judging and failure 
2. Learning is always better if it’s outside, hands-on, active, not sitting in seats listening to lecture 
3. Being able to test out a lot of dreams and passions and take risks to discover possible future path


Yampah Grads 2014 Thank School.pdf

YMHS Launch Careers Post Article.pdf

ymhs- pair of friends....pdf



3.  The Science of Adolescent Learning

What are your top three insights about how young people learn — the insights you’re most passionate about bringing to life in your school?


William Glasser's Choice Theory is the foundational philosophy of the school and support our understanding about how we learn. Focusing on Choice Theory supports our work to engage students’ internal motivation, supporting students' engagement in their own learning experiences. 

This guiding philosophy acknowledges these premises when working with together:
* Relationships are central to our interactions and our experience.
* The only person whose behavior we can control is our own.
* All we can give or get from other people is information.  How we deal with that information is our own choice.
* We are motivated by what we choose to put into our Quality World (what matters to us).
* We act to satisfy our needs of this picture.  

As well, Choice Theory acknowledges that all people have in addition to basic needs, the following needs which influence our behaviors and choices and impact a school's need to address these needs in our work with students:
POWER
LOVE & BELONGING
FREEDOM
FUN

Glasser, Maslow, Dweck and many others clearly define the importance of safety and security for any of us to reach our greatest happiness and potential. We maintain a consistent commitment to personalizing each student’s plan, and upholding a sense of love and belonging, freedom, power and fun within our daily existence. We also teach students that "failure" is yet another learning experience, and just one of our paths toward development. And that all of us can improve and grow in any field we find important to our lives: school content areas, music & sports, sports, our inter-personal relationships with others, our environment or our community, our intra-personal understandings of ourselves our emotions and reactions, etc.  Students, parents, faculty and our communities love our school; for many students, Yampah is home. 

Our holistic approach to serving our kids encourages trust and deepens relationships. Our advisory program allows kids to receive the affective support they need to be successful in school. Our kids know they belong. They know they are loved and they know they are deeply respected and accepted. Regardless of programming, schools fail kids when they do not place relationships and trust at the center of school culture.  For us, this priority then translates into student commitment to school, learning, confidence and respect for community.

INSIGHTS TO LEARNING:
1. Students need Love & Belonging, Fun, Freedom and Power in their learning environment.
2. Relevance, purpose and passion make learning meaning and engaging.
3. Student benefit from a learning environment focused on a growth mindset, constantly striving to help all learners understanding the potential of success and failure in our ability to continuously develop. 


Choice Theory and Learning.pdf

Growth Mindset Overview.pdf



















​​

DESIGN



1.  School Mission & Culture

What mission, purpose, and core values will animate and unify your school? Consider how these might build the engagement of students and adults, rally the support of your community, and drive the development of your school.


Mission: Yampah is a learning community designed to develop meaningful relationships, an appreciation of lifelong learning, and the academic skills necessary for the 21st Century student.

Yampah is a small school with a big soul.  We serve our community by remaining committed to our culture and defining principles yet we have maintained nimble flexibility and response to our rapidly changing population, communities and the larger world.  
 
Yampah holds the Coalition of Essential Schools’ Ten Guiding Principles (http://essentialschools.org) and William Glasser’s Choice Theory (http://www.wglasser.com) at the heart of our school climate. We use a Restorative Justice approach to solve problems when harm is done to that community to best help repair and reintegrate our core values. Regardless of shifting variables in the education world, our mission and our core beliefs drive our experience.


little_guide_to_choice_theory.pdf

The CES 10 Common Principles.pdf

















2.  Teaching & Learning

How will you enable and demonstrate student-centered, standards-based learning at your school? Illustrate your vision by describing two learning experiences that show how students will learn deeply and build toward mastery.


Students learn best by participating in experiential mini-courses.  We offer many opportunities for Service and Leadership through our trips. Courses including training in cultural and personal awareness as well as Restorative Justice. 

One example is a trip to Crestone, Colorado where students participate in a Camino de Crestone, please see: http://www.caminodecrestone.com. The week long trip includes the exploration of many world cultures including Native American, Hindu, Christian, Buddhist, Sufi, Muslim etc., and culminates in a 3 day Restorative Justice Conference.  Students produce journals, written reflections, participate in required readings, complete a final project such as a short film, and upload all artifacts and photos onto their eportfolios. 

A second example, of deep learning is the Pine Ridge Reservation Service trip. Before leaving for the week long field experience, students student the history of relocation and genocide of native peoples in America.  The also spend time understand the specific cultures of the diverse nations of indigenous people of North America. One on the reservation, Yampah students work with the Re-Member organization, please see: http://www.re-member.org. Each day consists of a daily history lesson usually specifically regarding broken treaties and political responses that can support change today, a time for "wisdom of the elders"  when an elder shares stories of cultural understanding with the group, a time for service out in the community, a visit to an historic site, such as the Wounded Knee Massacre site or participation a cultural experience, such as a "Wiping of Tears" ceremony.

Other experiential trips offered this year: Chicago Arts, Glacier Park, CO River Experience, HERA Rock Climb trip, Sylvan Lake Hut Trip. LA Service Trip, Grand Tetons Outdoor Trip, Wolf Sanctuary Trip, Local Art Studio Tours, Arts & Theater Exploration, Sustainability Studies- Building Greenhouse & Strawbale structures see blog of experience at: http://yampahgreenhouse.blogspot.com and more... please see attachments for additional examples.

In regards to alignment of Co State Standards (Common Core) and demonstration of knowledge, the Yampah curriculum and assessment process adheres to a "Less is More, Depth over Coverage" principle:

CURRICULUM:
At Yampah the curriculum is inquiry based, students are guided in uncovering content through focused learning expeditions. We ask students to explore Inquiry Questions so that learning becomes their own discovery. Students are supports in achievement & growth in their ability to master the Colorado Academic Standards & 21st Century Skills through a variety of guided learning opportunities. Personalized learning plans support each student to find relevance in education.

Every student is assigned an advisor and advisory group to work with during their entire time at Yampah.  The advisor and advisory group are the foundation for the school accountability structure to ensure the rigor for the personalized learning plan to meet graduation and credit requirements. 
 
Student’s personalized plans allow them to earn credit through a variety of methods including: direct instruction in YMHS classes which include focused “passages” of the content area, individual studies or “personal passages”, online & internet-based learning, post-secondary options, and experiential learning experiences:
*Students may participate in community-based learning opportunities. We regularly have students involved in service learning at local nonprofits, work-study internships at local business, and studies with artists in residence or other trades.
* In collaboration with the CO Workforce Center, our online credit program, Key Train, aligned to the ACT Work Keys assessment, is designed to help students reach competency in workplace related academic skills including: mathematics, technology, research & observation, business writing, and teamwork.  Other online curriculum to support student learning at an individualized pace includes Kahn Academy and Study Island.
* Credit can be earned through coursework at a post-secondary institution such as the local community college.  We encourage all students to earn dual high school and college credit at Colorado Mountain College in at least 1 class before graduation.
 
ASSESSMENT:
The Portfolio assessment is used at Yampah for students to demonstrate understanding of Post-secondary Workforce Readiness (PWR); Learning & Life Skills aligned to 21st Century Skills (Quests). Portfolios consist of student work samples of academic progression over time.
 
Please see student ePortfolio example at:  http://smmkeportfolio.weebly.com

“I’VE GOT THE PWR”-- “Postsecondary and workforce readiness (PWR)” describes the knowledge, skills, and behaviors essential for high school graduates to be prepared to enter college and the workforce and to compete in the global economy. The description assumes students have developed consistent intellectual growth throughout their high school career as a result of academic work that is increasingly challenging, engaging, and coherent. Postsecondary education and workforce readiness assumes that students are ready and able to demonstrate the following without the need for remediation.
 
The portfolio, or collection of work samples, is divided into two sections.  Section I is the academic area that is demonstrated through course/passage completion on the student transcript.  Students will show mastery by including their transcript, UBDs, ICAP: Individualized Career & Academic Plan and ICAP Milestone: Annual Learner Review.  Section II is divided into 6 Quests of 21st Century Skills.  The 10 PWR Learner Behavior & Life Skills necessary for success demonstrate these skills after high school. Mastery of these skills is demonstrated by presenting work samples in the form of final projects for each PWR at trimester portfolio presentations.  These PWRs may be fulfilled through participation in classes, passages, work study, service learning, internships, interim experiences, performances, college courses, Friday outings, etc.


Creating ‘Bernays Academy’ _ PostIndependent.pdf

yampah solar suitcases.pdf


















3. Student Agency & Engagement

How will your school support and enable students to form positive identities as continuous learners, build complex skills, and contribute as members of their communities? Develop profiles of 2-3 representative students and describe their growth and development through high school.


STUDENT PROFILE 1:
Ana graduated from the Teen Parent Program.  She was only sixteen when her son was born.  When she enrolled she had a history of engaging in risky behaviors including drug use, alcohol use, and violent relationships.  Ana completed all her high school coursework at Yampah and her son spent two years in our nurseries.  When they graduated, Ana began working in preschools where she could take her son to school with her.  Her interest in early childhood education began at the Teen Parent Program.  First, she volunteered in our nursery. Then, she began volunteering at other local preschools and attending early childhood workshops.  After graduation, she continued to study at Colorado Mountain College to receive her preschool group leader qualification.  
 
Today, Ana’s service to others continues to develop. Today she is a student in  the Colorado Mountain College Nursing Program as a scholarship recipient of the program.  She currently works at a local health clinic.  Her supervisor has told the Yampah staff that they think she is a reliable and contributing staff member.  Her success at her job has motivated her to continue her education.  The childcare director visits with Ana frequently. Ana realizes that the choices she made as a teenager impacted her and her child’s future, creating more difficulties than she might have faced not being a teen mom.  However, she is thankful to the Teen Parent Program for giving her the opportunity to complete her high school diploma, provide her son with his first education and help her develop and strive for success.  
 
Ana’s son is now in sixth grade. His teacher reports that he is a lively, inquisitive student doing well in school.  Ana often volunteers at her son’s school and on more than one occasion has been an outdoor education tent group leader for his class.  Ana’s success is due to her continued desire to be the best parent possible.  We believe the Teen Parent Program acted as a springboard for her personal mission.
 
Ana is one example of many success stories.  Over the years, many TPP graduates have completed their AA Degrees from Colorado Mountain College: several have completed BA degrees at Colorado Universities. Graduates have been employed as bilingual office personnel for Mountain Family Health, Glenwood Medical Associates, Pediatric Partners amongst other community organizations such as the Garfield Department of Social Services.  Recently, the Post-Independent’s People’s Choice Awards in GWS, highlighted one graduate as the “Best Hairdresser” and yet another graduate was highlighted as the organizer of the event.  Over the years, many of our graduates have received college scholarships including:  CMC Nursing Scholarship, Vickie Lee Green Realty Scholarship, Yampah Vapor Cave Scholarship, Schuss Charitable Trust Scholarship and CMC Latino Scholarship.

STUDENT PROFILE 2:
“John” started at Yampah after being unsuccessful at several public and private schools, including some time home schooling. Although he loved to learn, he disliked school so much that he just stopped going. He didn’t know how to interact with classmates or teachers, but he worked on his behaviors at Rebound in group and individual therapy and began to change, which allowed him better access to education. After graduation, John studied two chosen trades in Job Corps. Today he attends community college in New York, where he is enthusiastic about the future. He reports that Yampah gave him a learning environment where his teachers were friends and mentors who showed they cared about him. The teachers listened and got to know him and explained things in a personalized way that helped him learn best. “I feel I can call any one of them today, and it would be like talking to an old friend.”


ymhs alumni quotes.pdf

Student Spotlight_ Allyssa Szczelina _ PostIndependent.pdf


















4.  Networks & Partnerships

What partners will be part of the ongoing work of the school? Explain how partners will work together to design and plan the school, and how your partnership will support student learning, engagement, development, and connection to post-secondary success


Yampah Mountain HS-GlenX Super School project is working in conjunction with Mountain BOCES, Colorado Mountain College, Glenwood Springs Chamber, the local school districts (RFSD, R16, Re2), Aspen Community Foundation, Cradle to Career Initiative, and local business leaders.  


Yampah Mountain High School is the only public alternative educational setting serving all of Garfield county and parts of Eagle and Pitkin County.  


In addition to partner organizations for the super school project, Staff will work with a variety of community organizations to create positive outcomes for the young children and high school students enrolled in our program, i.e.: Qualistar, GarCo Childcare Division & DHS, La Leche League, Mountain Family Health, Alpine Legal Services, CMC, Family Resource Center, CET, Catholic Charities, Advocate Safehouse, Mind Springs, Aspen Hope Center, Wiley Arts Center, Cooking Matters, PREP and Colorado Workforce Center, Family Visitor Program/Nurse-Family Partnership amongst others. 


ACF Letter of Support.pdf

CMC letter of support.pdf

Diana Sirko letter of support.pdf